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jiveassturkey View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jiveassturkey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 October 2004 at 11:10pm

Here are just a few simple reasons why the RIAA can kiss my ass:

1.  It used to be that you heard what the radio played and that's all you knew.  It was so bad that different regions of the United States were listening to different types of music.  I'm from Seattle and alot of the music you hear in this area still isn't played in the rest of the country.  That's going away fast with P2P and ripping.  Now, I can listen to a friends Ipod in Maryland and hear music from all over the world that I couldn't find. 

2.  Small bands that kick ass but get the nose up from the record industry are now being heard nationwide.  That's just the sh*t!

3.  Years ago, I paid alot for a kickass cassette player so I could hear cassette quality.  Now I'm paying alot for a kickass CD player (make it five or six) so I can hear digital quality, not almost digital, you dumbass.

4.  Last but not least, my great grandmother just passed away about a month ago.  The music she liked would have been near impossible to find in todays crappy music stores.  We're talking classic country and gospel and I don't live in the south.  Using programs like this, I was able to get her a couple good burned CD's to listen to in the nursing home.  Without it, I guess she could've listened to the crap I won't even listen to on the radio.

I wish the RIAA luck helping Lars pay the bills, but, unless they can ban music altogether, they're gonna have a tough time holding the bullsh*t above my head. 

 

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Trafficone View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Trafficone Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 November 2004 at 5:18pm
    It is not only human and desireable to want stuff for less. It is an American tradition, not until the mid 1800's, America printed copyrighted matirial to sell at a lower price. The European copyrighting companies were furious and this caused tension. Where did the problem go? It dissappeared, more American writers could sell cheaper books anyway, so the problem disappeared. Now the common man can be published if they do good work and a publishing company is willing to put their work into print.
    
But what inspired all these people to write?
     Literacy rates rose with the increase of public education, and more people wanted more entertainment of a higher calibur than that of whatever they had. Novels, periodicals, and magazines started popping up all over, and started this literary revolution that we still see.
    But what of Music?

    Music was an event for the longest time, all the time before recording infact (sans the one vase that accidentilly recorded the shop it was made in... but THAT's another story!) Now music was portable with the inventions that followed, but it was still expensive because of things like the Radio and whatnot that made it possible to listen to recorded music for free by the use of advertizements. Because of the digital revolution, recorded music that the consumers choose is a new wave. People are getting used to the fact that they can listen to all the bands they want, only the songs they want, and not having to wait through DJ's, commercials, or change CDs, 8-tracks, phonographs, records, tapes, etc. So, if history serves as a map, all that will happen is more record companies will spring up, and the price of CD's will plummit. Sorry RIAA, you lose, history wins this round.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jzyehoshua Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 October 2006 at 8:55pm

Hey, I had a chance to use the old stuff like Napster and chose not to because I was concerned about the legality, even before they got caught.  I like others bought CD's before and got gipped when they had only 1 good song or so on each one.  I started recording songs with casettes which I knew was legal.  When I found StationRipper I checked into it to make sure it was legal, and clearly it is since it's essentially the same thing as recording with tapes. 

As already pointed out, the music industry has been charging ridiculous prices for CD's and getting away with it.  Even if everyone were to start getting songs from StationRipper rather then buying CD's, artists could still make very good money just from concerts alone.  The music industry has brought this on itself for overcharging on CD's for so long.  As it is, you can listen to a lot of songs just by finding an artist website or music video site if you really want to. 

Artists have been coming out with CD's where they intentionally just put 1 or 2 good songs on and then put a bunch of junk on other then that.  And why do you think there are less ballads now?  Because it's easier to come up with a catchy chorus then fill the songs with quality content all the way through.  If I want to recognize and support an artist for having a lot of good songs, I'd rather just buy one CD just to support them and get a CD's worth of songs from StationRipper, at least then I get my money's worth. 

An artist who makes even half their songs quality ones seems the exception rather then the rule these days.  For this reason probably more then any other, I stopped buying CD's.  Even greatest hits CD's are garbage.  You're better off just finding them individually and since the Music Industry has refused to budge at all and treat consumers fairly, the obvious answer has been to just choose a different option, and a legal one, I may add.

They've (the music industry) been overcharging for songs for so long now that I think most of it is that me and others are simply getting fed up of dealing with them.  I'm guessing the original poster is really a music exec who's trying to get people off here, not for the moral reasons he suggests (he didn't give very good reasoning either that I saw) but just in hopes of lining his pockets with more overcharged prices on helpless consumers. 



Edited by jzyehoshua
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lostcowboy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 November 2006 at 2:57am
It looks like the record companies, have some new legislation that they are trying to push through congress. you can read about it on the streamripper's web site. http://streamripper.sourceforge.net/

As far as what broadcaster said, I think they passed that law on internet streams, before there were programs to save the streams. I personally think that internet streams should pay at the same rate as radio broadcasters. But it did not happen that way.

As far as broadcasting at a high bit rate goes, I think 32Kbits is just fine. It is good enough that you can tell if you like the song. It is about like AM radio, but with stereo.

As far as File sharing/stream ripping causing the record industry to lose money, give me a break! The record industry's loses are in my opinion due to the baby boomer's moving out of the record buying age, and nothing more. I should know, I am one of them, I mostly buy oldies music. But my collection is pretty good, and I don't buy much any more. So the record companies loses are just due to less people buying the new music that I don't like anyway. Its not that the music is bad, its just not the type that I grew up on. I think when you get to about 25 years of age your tastes in music pretty much freeze , I am not saying that I don't like any of the new artist but it is rare, and getting rarer. That's my take on it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GnosisMan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 November 2010 at 8:14pm
I've been getting most of my music from a Russian web site called legalsounds.com at 9 CENTS a each song. 9 freaking cents!
I've been buying from them for the last 4 years and it's all CD quality and ALL LEGAL.

So how is it that they sell music so cheap? It makes you wonder just how much the record co makes in profits...too much I say. So as long as I get my tunes a 9 cents each, I'll be buying em up!! I've never bought a CD in four years and I intend to keep it that way and if SR goes under, recording "what you hear" is still legal. Should the US sell songs at 9 each, I'll be the first in line but until then, I'm ripping and going to Legalsound.com

Steve Jobs has pretty much a monopoly on online music and I will never buy from him or anyone who sells music for 99 cents a track .it's just too much -and still proprietary- when you get music from itunes..I HATE THAT! it's a rip off. ....nuf said   

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